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Our History

The seeds for what would become Covenant Health can be traced to 1918 when three doctors, J.T. Hutchinson, O.F. Peebler and A.R. Ponton established the Lubbock Sanitarium at 1301 Broadway. The hospital evolved throughout the last century as Lubbock General Hospital, Lubbock Memorial Hospital and Methodist Hospital.

Plains Hospital and Clinic was started in 1937 by Drs. O. Key, S.C. Arnett and F.B. Malone at 2605 19th Street, where Café J and Chrome are now housed. It evolved into St. Mary of the Plains Hospital when the Sisters of St. Joseph of Orange assumed ownership.

Covenant Health was created when Methodist Hospital and St. Mary of the Plains Hospital merged in 1998.

Today Covenant Health not only serves Lubbock but includes a region that ministers to patients and families across West Texas and eastern New Mexico.

  • 1909

    Lubbock was established as a city.

  • 1918

    Lubbock Sanitarium (Methodist) opened.

    Opened by Drs. A.R. Ponton, O.F. Peebler, and J.T. Hutchinson at 1301 Broadway; Dr. Ponton's nurse training school (now known as Covenant School of Nursing) moved from Post, TX to the Sanitarium.

  • 1919

    Dr. M.C. Overton joined Lubbock Sanitarium (Methodist).

  • 1923

    Texas Technological College (Texas Tech University).

    Established by the State Legislature.

  • 1927

    Nurse dormitory was located at 1000 block of Avenue N.

  • 1937

    Plains Hospital and Clinic (St. Mary) opened.

    Opened with 10 beds by Drs. O. Key, S.C. Arnett, and F.B. Malone at 2605 19th Street. Café J and Chrome operate in this location.

  • 1939

    Plains Hospital Purchased.

    St. Joseph of Orange Sisters purchased Plains Hospital and Clinic for $57,901 from Drs. Key, Arnett, and Malone, and renamed it St. Mary of the Plains Hospital.

  • 1941

    Lubbock locations renamed.

    Lubbock Sanitarium became Lubbock General Hospital and Lubbock General Hospital School of Nursing (Methodist). In 1945 it was renamed Lubbock Memorial Hospital.

  • 1952

    Time capsule at Lubbock Memorial Hospital.

    A time capsule including a Bible, a copy of the Lubbock Morning Avalanche, photos, and other documents was buried behind the cornerstone of the new Lubbock Memorial Hospital (Methodist) building, 3615 19th Street, which opened in 1953.

  • 1954

    Hospital name change.

    The Northwest Texas Conference of the United Methodist Church voted to take ownership of Lubbock Memorial Hospital, and changed the name to Methodist Hospital.

  • 1963

    Innovation by Methodist.

    The first electrically powered beds were purchased by Methodist for $15,000 per unit.

  • 1964

    First EVAR surgery performed in region.

    The region's first (13th in world) abdominal aortic aneurysm repair surgery was performed by Dr. R.J. Salem with Drs. J. Huff, R. Vardy, T. Bridwell, S. Dunn and J. Dunn Jr.

  • 1966

    Medicare went into effect.

  • 1968

    St. Mary's new building.

    Ground was broken for St. Mary's new building on 24th Street, which opened in 1970. The dirt moved to create the pond at Maxey Park helped build up the foundation.

  • 1970

    F5 tornado hits Lubbock.

    A devastating F5 tornado hit Lubbock. The same year Dr. D.L. Bricker performed the first open heart surgery with Drs. R.J. Salem, M.E. DeBakey, and D.A. Cooley.

  • 1972

    New medical classes for college students.

    Texas Tech University's School of Medicine opened to students. Classes met in the new St. Mary of the Plains Hospital until the TTU facilities were enlarged to accomodate the students.

  • 1976

    Cancer Treatment Center.

    Methodist opened the Harlan Hodges Regional Cancer Treatment Center, home to the first brain scanner in West Texas. The center was later enveloped into Joe Arrington Cancer Center.

  • 1981

    St. Joseph Health was established in California.

  • 1987

    New rehab fitness center.

    A fitness center was added to Methodist's Cardiac Rehab facility, which is now known as the LifeStyle Centre.

  • 1988

    Hospital merger in Levelland.

    South Park Hospital in Levelland merged with Methodist, now known as Covenant Health Levelland.

  • 1989

    Helicopter service available.

    St. Mary began first helicopter ambulance service in West Texas called Flight for Life.

  • 1992

    Hospital merger in Plainview.

    Central Plains Hospital in Plainview merged with Methodist, now known as Covenant Health Plainview.

  • 1995

    Joe Arrington Cancer Center.

    St. Mary of the Plains Hospital opened Joe Arrington Cancer Center, named after Dr. J.O. Arrington, Jr.

  • 1998

    Hospitals merge.

    Methodist Hospital and St. Mary of the Plains Hospital merged, now known as Covenant Health.

  • 1999

    Hospice of Lubbock becomes part of Covenant Health.

  • 2000

    Covenant Health formed Covenant Medical Group.

  • 2007

    Covenant Health Partners formed.

    Covenant Health formed Covenant Health Partners. Also that year Covenant opened an infusion therapy center with Nor-Lea in Lovington, NM.

  • 2010

    Richard Parks was named as Covenant Health's President and CEO.

  • 2014

    Heart & Vascular Institute.

    Covenant Health's Heart and Vascular Institute is the first and only heart program in the region to perform Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) procedures.

  • 2015

    New clinic in Lubbock.

    Northwest Clinic opened at N. Frankford and Erskine to meet the needs of patients in the northwest area of Lubbock.

  • 2017

    Covenant Children's is licensed as the only free-standing children's hospital in the region.

  • 2018

    100 years of service.

    Covenant Health and Covenant School of Nursing celebrate 100 years of providing a ministry of health care to residents of the South Plains.

  • 1909
  • 1918
  • 1919
  • 1923
  • 1927
  • 1937
  • 1939
  • 1941
  • 1952
  • 1954
  • 1963
  • 1964
  • 1966
  • 1968
  • 1970
  • 1972
  • 1976
  • 1981
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989
  • 1992
  • 1995
  • 1998
  • 1999
  • 2000
  • 2007
  • 2010
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2017
  • 2018